Strengthen Your Family Through Biblical Homeschooling

Tag: homeschool

biblical homeschool for christian home educators

Why Art?

Art is an important part of education. It encourages creativity and causes minds to flourish. Don’t take middle school art education lightly. You may end up having a your own Picasso-like masterpiece hanging in your living room one day.

Art projects catering to your middle schooler offer a way to rest minds from ‘book learning’ when the year has grown tedious! Field trips are a great way to encourage art creativity, so think in terms of combining the two when you can.

Art Project Ideas

  1. Tile Murals – Non-Glassy Ceramic tiles are great for this project. You will need acrylic paint or oil paint with brushes, silicone glue/dispenser gun, and an empty wall space. You can choose a theme for them to design like something from history, or allow them to just do whatever comes to their mind. When dry, display!
  2. Coffee Filter Booklet- This is a fun and unique art project. Kinderart explains it the best with a sample picture. Visit http://kinderart.com/across/coffee.shtml for full details.
  3. Cave Paintings – You will need small bags, an old spoon, old bowls, vegetable shortening, old toothbrushes, mural paper, masking tape, and dirt. This is a prehistoric idea. Again, visit http://kinderart.com/arthistory/cavepainting.shtml for full details.
  4. Live Paintings – In this research project, students compile information on different paintings throughout history. Students then write an essay comparing the paintings they have found. Use an art museum field trip as research!
  5. Craft Stick Trees – Gather 1 large craft stick, 7 small craft sticks, brown paint, as well as red, orange, and green felt. A glue gun is the best tool to make the tree stick together. Cut out little leaf shapes from each color. Paint all of the craft sticks brown. Glue all of the smaller craft sticks onto the large stick to resemble branches. When that dries, add all of the little leaves. When dry, you have the perfect little tree.

What else?

Other middle school art project ideas can range from dinosaur eggs and friendship pins to paper quilling and pencil holders. There are so many creative ideas out there. Pinterest is a great online tool to search for all things middle school art.

Tell us about your most successful art ideas in the comments below? Or, tell us about your biggest challenge/art fail so others can help you find a fix or suggest a different approach?

This article was originally published on our Homeschool Launch Blog.

 

For more on homeschooling and art read, “Why Creating a Masterpiece Works“.

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Rethink Home Education

To further your reading, we have a special ebook that we would like to send to you. It’s entitled “RETHINK EDUCATION, Turning Scary Questions About Home Education Into Exciting Possibilities.” It was written after countless conversations with moms who are either considering homeschooling or struggling with doubt. My heart in writing it is to offer hopeful answers to some of the questions moms tend to be asking… and you might be surprised at which ones didn’t make the list. I would love for it to become a resource you could share with your friends who are considering home education, or who are wondering if they’ll keep going. So, grab your copy today! – Leslie Nunnery

 

Register for the Homeschool Convention Today

Tweens and Saving Money

There’s never really been a good word for kids between the ages of 8–12. There was a time in the early fifties when they were called “subteens.” Flattering, right? Some folks started calling them “‘tween-agers,” and eventually we just settled on “tweens.”

Our struggle to come up with an acceptable term for this group reinforces the idea that 8–12 is kind of a lost age. They don’t require the same kind of constant supervision as young kids, but they don’t have the independence of teenagers.

But this is a pivotal time where kids feel trapped in an awkward transition. They’re learning to relate to peers, adjust to social rules, and develop the skills they’ll need in their teen years. And these skills include money management.

 

Here are some hands-on tips for giving them a financial jump start.

 

Start talking to them about banking.

If you don’t have a savings and spending account for your pre-teens, it’s probably time. Learning to manage a bank account is a must. In fact, putting money into a savings account is one of the best habits a tween can pick up. For every $10 they earn, try encouraging them to put $1 into savings.

If you’re curious about savings and spending accounts for your tween, take a look at these new options.

 

Get them a debit card.

Our world is a lot less reliant on bills and coins. And a debit card prepares your child for money handling in a largely digital world. Think about it this way; when you can control the spending limits and access, a card becomes safer than giving your kids cash—especially when you can set limits on the card.

Debit cards for kids? Yep! You can learn more here.

 

Help them make online purchases.

Making an online purchase is a fairly common activity. Kids should be as comfortable buying something on Amazon as they are making brick-and-mortar store purchases. Guiding them through this process demystifies this ordinary task.

 

Teach them how to monitor their account with an app.

Monthly paper bank statements are so 2006. It’s easier than ever to track your account activity. The ability to check in on your account from a mobile app adds a whole new level of security to banking. Your child should be able to monitor their account and their spending habits—and you should, too.

Learn more about mobile banking apps for you and your tween.

 

Help them make money outside the home.

At this age, they’re ready to start experimenting with work. Why not talk to family, neighbors, and church members about opportunities for doing yard work, babysitting, or helping others with chores? This not only helps them make money to deposit in their account, but it also instills a strong work ethic.

 

Give your tween a jump start.

You can’t teach the most important lessons in a day; they require consistent involvement and reinforcement. That’s why it’s critical to teach your child smart money managing principles and techniques early.

 

You want your tween to jump into their teens with boldness. The Start Young Savings and Spending Accounts from Evangelical Christian Credit Union (ECCU) will equip your child with the tools they need to manage their money effectively while offering you the right amount of visibility into every area. It’s confidence for them—and you!

 

Check out the Start Young Accounts today, and start preparing your child for their teen years.

 

Looking for more great articles about teaching your children how to manage and steward their money? Check out Pizza Prepares Kids To Make Sense Of Money, To Build Kid’s Money Handling Habits, Start Young, and Common Sense Savings Skills That Aren’t So Common on the Teach Them Diligently Blog.

 

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Aiming Arrows into Adulthood

Teach Them Diligently 365 members, listen to:

“Aiming Arrows into Adulthood”

As homeschooling parents, how can we prepare our children for adulthood? And how can we prepare our hearts (through prayer and effective communication) to release our kids, into a new season? There’s life after graduation– with college, careers, romance, weddings, and next-generation purpose. Let’s aim and launch our arrows to hit God’s mark!

Become a member of Teach Them Diligently 365 for access to more!

Sign up for a free 7 day trial and explore the extensive content!

 

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Now that fall is in full swing, it’s a fun time to explore nature and complete fun fall activities and crafts. Since preschoolers thrive on their senses, sensory play and activities will help enrich their development.

Sensory Projects

Pumpkin Spice Play Dough– Preschoolers love play dough. Squishing hands through the soft texture is very stimulating, plus it encourages creativity. Take it up a notch by making it with a fun fall scent like pumpkin.

Here are the ingredients:

1 cup water

2 tsp Pumpkin Pie Spice

1 cup flour

1 tsp Cream of Tartar

1/4 cup salt

1 tsp vegetable oil

Food coloring (optional)

Add an orange color to the play dough to revolve around the pumpkin theme.

Harvest Sensory Bin – Grab any size bin you desire and fill it with nature. Wood chips, shells, acorns, corn husks, pine cones, hay, etc. are just a few of the many items you can use to fill the bins. Put toy cars and tractors into the harvest bin and watch your preschooler become a little farmer.

Painting Pine Cones – Preschoolers and painting go hand in hand. Go outside and hunt for pine cones, bring inside, and paint with spice paints. Add your favorite fall spices to autumn paint colors. The pine cones will display beautiful autumn colors with fall scents.

Sweet Potato Goop – Many preschoolers like to get all gooey and sticky. Getting messy is just plain fun sometimes. Try this fun idea for sweet potato goop.

DSC_3275

Harvest Puffy Finger Paint – When it comes to preschoolers and finger painting, you can’t go wrong. Make it more exciting with turning simple paint into puffy paint. Just mix equal parts red, orange, yellow and brown food coloring with Elmer’s glue and shaving cream. After it dries, the texture is puffy. It’s so much fun.

Harvest Discovery Bottles – These are so much fun to make and play with. Fill a plastic bottle with mini leaves, mini pumpkins, etc. To see more, click image.

 

Let your creativity flow and watch your child’s creativity flourish as you do. Try new things, even messy ones, and encourage your child’s willingness to do the same.

What is your child’s favorite activity? We’d love to see your ideas for fall fun. Share a link to an activity you discovered in the comments below.

This article was originally published on our Homeschool Launch Blog.

 

 

Here is a link to sign up for our Teach Them Diligently newsletter to receive more great articles!

You may also find many more articles on the topic of Family under blogs.

 

Rethink Home Education

To further your reading, we have a special ebook that we would like to send to you. It’s entitled “RETHINK EDUCATION, Turning Scary Questions About Home Education Into Exciting Possibilities.” It was written after countless conversations with moms who are either considering homeschooling or struggling with doubt. My heart in writing it is to offer hopeful answers to some of the questions moms tend to be asking… and you might be surprised at which ones didn’t make the list. I would love for it to become a resource you could share with your friends who are considering home education, or who are wondering if they’ll keep going. So, grab your copy today! – Leslie Nunnery

 

Register for the Homeschool Convention Today

What to write…

Does your student have a passion for writing? Are writing assignments met with groans of protest? These fall writing themes will foster writing fun for even reluctant writers. Here are some eye-catching writing prompts to kick off the season in your home:

Describe Fall with your Five Senses – Ask your middle schooler to explain how their senses work by challenging them to describe the season using their senses. How does their favorite fall treat taste? What are their favorite fall sounds and smells? Go for nature walks and have them use adjectives to describe the sounds they hear.  Note how sound carries differently now than during other seasons. Encourage noticing tiny details to get creative juices flowing.

Describe Carving a Pumpkin – Many families will carve pumpkins during October. Images and designs are endless.  Ask your student to write about how they would like to carve their pumpkin. If this is an activity they have never done but would like to, go out and pick a pumpkin,(fun fall field trip) allow them to carve and experience, then write about it.

Make a List of Fall Activities – What does your middle schooler like to do in the fall? Go to the apple orchard? Go on a hayride? Jump in a pile of raked leaves? Have your student write about their favorites and add as much detail as they can.

Describe your Favorite Donut – Have them get creative by pretending to be the donut, what flavor would they be or maybe describe their favorite donut and why. Write about a day in the life of a donut from 1st person. How does it feel to be eaten? Why not cap off  the activity by making donuts to celebrate the reluctant writer’s efforts?

Write about Baking a Pie – If your middle schooler loves baking, encourage them to bake their favorite and then write about the experience. Describe what it took to actually make the pie, so a friend could make one too.  Have students rate the results by describing how it tastes, what the texture was like, etc. Develop a survey sheet for family members to rate their pie eating experience.

Write about Favorite Candy – Does your middle schooler have a favorite type of candy? Encourage them to write about it from the name to color, texture, smell, etc. Compare and contrast their favorite candy with their least favorite.

Describe your Favorite Fall Outfit – What does your child like to wear during the fall season? Encourage them to write details on why they like it and why they chose colors, etc. If they are sensory defensive, ask them to describe how certain new fall fabrics irritate them vs which clothing items comfort them and why.

Thanksgiving – Have your middle schooler write about Thanksgiving and what they like about it noting sights, sounds, textures, and smells they remember from one year to the next. What are they most thankful for?

Be Creative

Fall writing prompts are endless. You can get really silly and creative as well. Encourage your middle schooler to develop  come up writing prompts for younger siblings and have them all write using that prompt — then compare the responses. Writing doesn’t have to be a drag; it can be fun and exciting.

Share your most successful fall writing prompt in the comments below.

This article was originally published on our Homeschool Launch Blog.

 

 

To learn even more helpful homeschooling tools, click here to sign up for the newsletter.

Do you want more articles on a wide range of topics like discipleship, academics, family, encouragement and general homeschooling?  Just click here to search the vast blog library!

 

Secrets to Making Writing Fun

Teach Them Diligently 365 members, listen to:

“Secrets to Making Writing Fun”

Writing can be an enjoyable activity for budding writers. This workshop will equip you with tips and ideas to use with elementary-age children during writing time. The result? Your children will not only produce polished writing projects, they’ll also be begging for the next lesson!

Become a member of Teach Them Diligently 365 for access to more!

Sign up for a free 7 day trial and explore the extensive content!

 

 

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New Year, New Path

Yes, this homeschool year looks very different than when we started! It looks very different than it did last year.

But what does it mean…

As I mused on that point, waxing a bit nostalgic about where we’ve been and looking forward to where we’re heading, I couldn’t help but think about how important it is first of all to know why we’re doing what we’re doing. There are many days when there simply aren’t enough hours to accomplish all that is asked of us. I feel overwhelmed often and defeated as I look at mountains of papers to grade and register. I feel unequal to the task God has given me, and I am unequal to that task. There is simply not enough of me to go around any more than there’s enough of any mom pouring her life into her family and trying to make a difference in the world as she does.

Foundation

Thank God, though, there is more than enough of His grace for each hour. He is the “lifter up of my head” on those days when I feel too weary to lift it myself or I am so discouraged I simply don’t want to. He reminds me of WHY we started on this journey all those years ago. We desired to instill in our children a deep-seated love for the Lord our God and a commitment to serve Him whatever He may ask of them. We wanted them to see the world and the needs represented throughout it. And, to enlarge their borders and their thinking beyond themselves and to encourage them to prepare with all their heart for the special calling God has for them.

Our foundation is far more important than our curriculum, method, or set up!

This article was originally published on our Homeschool Launch Blog.

 

 

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The A to Z of a Characterhealthy Homeschool

Teach Them Diligently 365 members, listen to:

“The A to Z of a Characterhealthy Homeschool”

If we homeschool simply to achieve high academic marks, we are squandering the opportunity to influence our children for Christ. Character healthy leaders are those children who have learned to elevate virtues above feelings. Check out the video for more information.

Become a member of Teach Them Diligently 365 for access to more!

Sign up for a free 7 day trial and explore the extensive content!

 

 

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Have you ever wondered how to get your extended family on board with homeschooling? There are all types of families who homeschool. Some families have very supportive extended families and others spend years trying to gain the approval of extended family.

As Christian parents, we know that the only approval that matters is God’s approval, but letting the grandparents get directly involved in some aspect of your kids education may help them see your choices in a different light. Here are some things that we have done to involve my kid’s grandparents in our homeschool.

Grandparents Nearby

We are blessed to have a set of grandparents that live right down the road from us. We live in the rural south and we are able to get together frequently. On occasion I have left my kids with my mom for the day and sent schoolwork with them for her to help them complete. We have invited her along on several field trips and 4H events. We go out of town with her to visit my grandma on occasion and they learn lessons about helping the elderly and meeting the needs of others.

Life Skills

kids on lawnmower

My dad is a man of many talents. He was raised in the city and moved to the country as a young married man and has dabbled in farming ever since. His past occupations have included contractor, builder, pastor, teacher, lawn business owner, etc. He built a house and my boys were able to participate and observe different aspects of the house building process. He purchased chickens and built a chicken coop, and the kids have helped clean out the chicken pen, gather eggs and watched the process of butchering. His most recent farming venture has been raising goats, and he children have really enjoyed learning about the goats. They have learned to split wood from their granddad too.

What do they learn?

Besides the life skills they have learned from their grandparents, the kids have also had many spiritual discussions with their grandparents. They love sharing scriptural truths with them as they work together and I think they will remember some of the lessons they have learned from them for the rest of their life.

Grandparents Far Away

VA family Christmas

The other sets of grandparents live over 650 miles away. We have had to be more creative in looking for ways to include them in our homeschool. In the past we have taken field trips to museums, aquariums and historic sites while visiting with them.

Their grandpa loves to play chess and my oldest son has been challenged to work on his game at home so  he can play Pepaw when we visit. We have lively history discussions with grandpa, he would take the boys fishing and teach them to fish for crab in the brackish water of the Chesapeake bay area.

Grandma read to the kids and took them treasure hunting at Goodwill, etc. The other set has taken us on a dolphin cruise in the Atlantic Ocean when we were studying dolphins and communicates with the kids regularly via Skype. We share artwork, details about our schoolwork and Lego creations via Skype.

A Fun Idea

We made a homeschool yearbook and sent it to the grandparents out of state. It was such a big hit! They were encouraged and were able to really see the progress we had made over the year. I plan to continue this tradition.

 

Other Suggestions

In addition to these suggestions that have worked for our family here are some other suggestions that I received from other homeschool moms:

  • Learning a foreign language together via Skype (grandma teaches the grand kids Latin).
  • Having grandparents use your lesson plans to continue schooling your kids during times of parent illnesses or surgery.
  • Have them teach skills they possess to their grand kids such as astronomy, art, sewing, music, etc.
  • Invite grandparents to teach group classes at your local homeschool co-op.
  • If they are willing, have grandparents invest in homeschool supplies such as maps, reference books, microscopes, etc.

I hope these ideas help spark your imagination and motivate you to tap into the great wisdom the senior members of your family have to offer your kids. We would love to hear your ideas in the comments section below.

 

Bio photo JSA

Jennifer Allen is a homeschool graduate, wife to her soulmate David (who also contributes to the blog), homeschooling mom, registered nurse, AWANA teacher, pianist, reader and lifelong learner. She can be found on her little corner of the web at conversaving.com. The person on the street would define “conversaving” as the act of easing the discomfort of someone left out of a conversation by including them in the dialogue.  “Conversaving” the blog seeks to do the same thing, by relieving the awkward silence across the Internet of those seeking a real place to engage in constructive conversations about news, family,homeschooling, saving money, etc.  Sprinkle in some laughs, tears, personal stories and curriculum reviews and you have the recipe for Conversaving.com!

This article was originally published on our Homeschool Launch Blog.

 

 

Here is a link to sign up for our Teach Them Diligently newsletter to receive more great articles!

You may also find many more articles on the topic of Family under blogs.

 

Rethink Home Education

To further your reading, we have a special ebook that we would like to send to you. It’s entitled “RETHINK EDUCATION, Turning Scary Questions About Home Education Into Exciting Possibilities.” It was written after countless conversations with moms who are either considering homeschooling or struggling with doubt. My heart in writing it is to offer hopeful answers to some of the questions moms tend to be asking… and you might be surprised at which ones didn’t make the list. I would love for it to become a resource you could share with your friends who are considering home education, or who are wondering if they’ll keep going. So, grab your copy today! – Leslie Nunnery

Register for the Homeschool Convention Today

Do you have a preschooler this fall and need a curriculum? Many homeschooling parents get concerned that they will not be able to homeschool their preschooler from home. Are there free curriculums that are designed specifically for them and cater to their developmental needs? Yes!

Prior to homeschooling my girls, I taught preschool and PreK.  I have researched high and low supplemental programs through the years and have found many to be pretty successful and yes, free. There are even new ideas out there as well.

Here is a list of some free curriculums out there designed specifically for the preschool child:

Easy Peasy All In One Homeschool
Starfall
PBS Kids
1+1+1=1
Letter of the Week by Confessions of a Homeschooler
Kinderplans
Cornerstone Confessions
Kids Learning Station

If you do a broad search online for free preschool printables, there are a variety of resources available.
Some may not offer all out curriculums but maybe free printables, etc. My favorite program for
preschool reading, etc., is Starfall. Two out of three of my homeschool students used this and they are
advanced readers to this day. It’s fantastic!

I like that some of the curriculum programs offer a nice balanced option of online learning (to keep kids up to date with advancing technology), and printables. Children as young as the preschool years are learning a bit more than they used to. These curriculums keep some of the traditional learning styles for dedicated homeschooling parents.
If you know of any other free preschool curriculum out there not listed here, feel free to share them with us.

This article was originally published on our Homeschool Launch Blog.

 

To learn even more helpful homeschooling tools, click here to sign up for the newsletter.

 

Do you want more fun articles on a wide range of topics like discipleship, academics, family, encouragement and general homeschooling?  Just click here to search the vast blog library!

 

 

A Hands On Approach To Educating Your Preschoolers

Teach Them Diligently 365 members, listen to:

“A Hands On Approach To Educating Your Preschoolers”

During this video session we will define the components of a quality preschool education, identify some of the important skills preschoolers need to learn, and learn how to create lessons and activities using a thematic hands on approach and look at lesson examples.

Become a member of Teach Them Diligently 365 for access to more!

Sign up for a free 7 day trial and explore the extensive content!

 

 

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Building strong social networks for teens provides a foundation for later success in life.

Homeschooling through high school has more ups and downs than a roller coaster. In these years, our teens seek a sense of identity and purpose. They want to try new things and experience ever-widening independence. Helping them practice independence, while you are around to gently guide them, is a healthy thing.

Teen Friendships

We all know teens have a gnawing desire to be around peers. They wonder how they measure up or fit in academically, socially, and physically. They want to know know they can lean on what they know about managing life and relationships without you there to oversee it all. Sometimes, they just want a break from family to figure out who they are and if they can stand on their own two feet!

Hormones and strong wills can test the best of us at this stage. I always felt as if we were revisiting the terrible two years when our children were developing independence. Keeping that comparison in mind helped me say yes to as many non-harmful things as I could.

Ask yourself, “How often do I say, ‘No,’ when my teen makes a request about social outings and events?”

If you are saying no more than yes, you may be poisoning your parent-child relationship. Unless they are asking to do something dangerous, work with your teen to turn as many ‘knee-jerk no’ answers into yes’s as you can.

It’s important to choose your battles wisely. As my wise husband once said:

Teen End Goals

When you are hyperventilating over the challenge in front of you, remember what your end goals are. When your parenting job is over, you want children who:

  1. Love God.
  2. Have strong character.
  3. Exhibit a strong work ethic.
  4. Maintain good relationships with friends and family.
  5. Are able to navigate the world with confidence and success.

Listening to their desires for social activity builds trust. Keep communication lines open by not criticizing their dreams and ideas, no matter how impractical they seem. Ask yourself how their request may be answered in a way that supports one of the five goals above.

Self-discovery is healthy when it’s allowed and encouraged within safe boundaries. Let them know you want them to succeed. If they know you won’t criticize them when they fail, they will feel safer coming to you when they do. And, they will.

Don’t fight their need for social activity because it is overwhelming or scary for you.  Work with your teens to create safe and trustworthy options now, so they will know how to set good boundaries later when you are not there. With some creativity, you can tweak most any social experience into ones which will satisfy you both.

Ideas for building strong social networks for teens:

  1. Start a small Bible study group in your home and help your teen lead it.
  2. Sign teens up for an online class. This is a great option for interacting and relationship-building with students from all over the world!
  3. Don’t hover when friends are around. Get a basic feel for the group interactions, retreat to give some privacy, and trust your teen’s judgment.
  4. Host a Biology dissection group with the help of a knowledgeable friend.
  5. Be willing to drive a group of high schoolers to a field trip or movie once a month.
  6. Sign your teen up for a class at the local community college. They will become comfortable when taught by others, practice social engagement during class, and earn dual credits.
  7. Encourage a new independent interest: horseback riding, ballet, debate team.
  8. Help them find a job and apply the experience towards a work study credit.
  9. Start a Literature co-op in your home. Go on related field trips, cook literature-themed foods, and host movie nights!
  10. Sign them up for a creative writing class that inspires self-expression and encourages self-publishing. Young writers can make an income!
  11. Help teens create service projects and invite others to participate.
  12. Play a team sport or join a tennis club.
  13. Do some things just for fun like ice skating, roller skating, geo-caching, or bowling to burn up energy.
  14. Join a choir, band, or theatre group.
  15. Host an art group and explore different art mediums like water color, art journaling, or stamping. Take the group to an art museum or art show.
  16. Make home movies, music videos, or documentaries.
  17. Host a teen talent night at your house or church.
  18. Host a makeover and snack night with the girls.
  19. Encourage them to be a summer camp counselor.
  20. Start a photo club and host a photo scavenger hunt.

 

If you feel ill-equipped for building strong social networks for teens in your home, go over  our list with your teen. Ask which ideas they like and brainstorm more. Guarantee ya, they’ll have some! Then, network with other parents to help build strong social networks for your teens and theirs. All of you will be giving your teens an enormous gift that will last a life time.

This article was originally published on our Homeschool Launch Blog.

 

 

Here is another great article on teenagers, “We’re Raising Grown Ups“.

 

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Aiming Arrows into Adulthood

Teach Them Diligently 365 members, listen to:

“Aiming Arrows into Adulthood”

As homeschooling parents, how can we prepare our children for adulthood? And how can we prepare our hearts (through prayer and effective communication) to release our kids, into a new season? There’s life after graduation– with college, careers, romance, weddings, and next-generation purpose. Let’s aim and launch our arrows to hit God’s mark!

Become a member of Teach Them Diligently 365 for access to more!

Sign up for a free 7 day trial and explore the extensive content!

 

 

 

Register for the Homeschool Convention Today
Homeschooling Parents

About David and Leslie Nunnery

Leslie Nunnery and her husband David founded Teach Them Diligently, the nation’s premier source for gospel-centered homeschool events. With seven years of homeschooling experience from preschool-high school and a passion to encourage and equip homeschool families, this mom of 4 shares her know-how and insights weekly through Teach Them Diligently media and on TeachThemDiligently365.com.

Yes, I want more from this Homeschooling Community!

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