Strengthen Your Family Through Biblical Homeschooling

Tag: ECCU

eccu start young money mangement

Over the last several months, we have been talking about our brand new, totally free  Homeschool Financial Counselor.  In addition to a free Roadmap to help you plot your approach to teaching financial literacy to your children, we have also published quite a few articles, produced live informational and instructional videos, and more from the team at Evangelical Christian Credit Union (ECCU).  As a mom (and a homeschool teacher,) I believe these resources are incredibly important for preparing our children to be good stewards of the good things God has given them and to prepare themselves to be usable no matter what He calls them to do. Carrying loads of debt, not managing resources wisely, etc., can be devastating when one is trying to follow God’s will for their lives. We don’t want our children to be strapped with that!!

Ready to find out more?  Download that road map today, sign up for our homeschool financial counselor program,  and check out these past blogs and videos for great tips:

Teaching Your Kids Stewardship (When you’re not good with money)

What You Need to Train Young Kids About Money

Tips for Teaching Kids to Manage God’s Resources

Giving Kids a Debit Card can be a Good Investment

Teach Your Kids to Succeed Financially: Video

TTD Financial Flying Start eBook – This is a transcript of an interview between Teach Them Diligently and ECCU.

Then, be sure to join us onsite at Teach Them Diligently events, where you can meet face to face with our homeschool financial counselor team.

Read on for more about ECCU and what they do to fuel a Christ-centered ministry worldwide!

ECCU Start Young Finances

Positive change from a biblical approach to banking:

At ECCU, your money does more than grow, it’s on a mission to change the world.

ECCU is a credit union for you, your family, your ministry and your church. We are a cooperative of Evangelical Christian individuals and organizations sharing our resources to grow and support ministry.

IN ADDITION to offering all the banking options you need (checking, savings, loans, credit cards, online and mobile banking, ATMs, etc.), we want to help you improve your financial life and give you the opportunity to align your finances with your faith.

Evangelical Christian Credit Union (ECCU) stands with homeschooling families with offers and resources that are specifically designed to benefit your unique lifestyle. 

Click the image and join the Financial Guidance Counselor Program for Free!

financial-guidance-counselor

And make your plans to join us at Teach Them Diligently Conventions this spring because we’ll have a special track of sessions that are all about finances, money savings, and financial education.

teach them diligently convention events speakers

For more great articles about teaching your children how to manage their money and more homeschooling information be sure to check out the Teach Them Diligently Blog.

Read through our essential homeschool resources for more encouragement!
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Read our Blog, join TTD365, follow on Facebook and Instagram, and sign up to attend one of our homeschool events!

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saving money teach children ECCU

eccu start young banner

 

Start Young Accounts encourage responsible saving and spending—all at a pace parents set.   These digital accounts give kids of all ages the hands-on features of adult banking, but with safeguards and limits that parents control.

Kids accounts that keep them accountable to you!
  • No maintenance fees or minimum balances
  • Digital banking for kids 0-17
  • Parental controls monitor account access and limit spending
  • Created by ECCU, the trusted source for stewardship development

 

Accounts also come with a Start Young Visa® Debit Card—complete with spending controls to help you safely teach your kids about using money in a digital world.

 

Discover Youth Accounts that You Control
Start Young Accounts help your kids learn how to save, spend
and grow their money—using practical skills based on biblical values.
 

Learn More Now!

 

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Our mailing address is:
ECCU 955 West Imperial Hwy, Ste. 100 Brea, CA 92821
Copyright ©2018 ECCU, All rights reserved.

Your savings federally insured to at least $250,000 and backed by the full faith and credit of the United States Government. National Credit Union Administration (NCUA), a U.S. Government Agency.

 

Click the image and join the Financial Guidance Counselor Program for Free!

financial-guidance-counselor

And make your plans to join us at Teach Them Diligently Conventions this spring because we’ll have a special track of sessions that are all about finances, money savings, and financial education.

 

teach them diligently convention events speakers

 

For more great articles about teaching your children how to manage their money and more homeschooling information be sure to check out the Teach Them Diligently Blog.

Sign up for the newsletter to receive more great articles!

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money management for homeschool kids

Teaching Kids to Use a Debit Card, can Really Pay Off

As Parents, we would never toss our car keys to our teenagers without first teaching them to drive. In fact, we begin explaining the rules of the road to our buckled bundles of joy as soon as we start shuttling them between their countless events. It’s a natural way to ease them into an important skill they’ll need later.

So, why would we send them out into the adult financial world without training them how to manage a debit card? Before they are inevitably bombarded to open a credit card, we can drive home the benefits and consequences of credit, but use a similar and safer alternative learning tool—a youth debit card.

A debit card can be a great way for kids to gain practical experience with digital money management while they are still under your guidance and protection.

They Get Card Experience—You Stay in Control

Kids can miss the fact that swiping a little plastic card equates to spending real money. Having their own debit card and account helps them understand the cost of each swipe. Your kids can see how fast money actually disappears on small things, and we can monitor and motivate our kids to make better financial decisions.

Practice Makes Perfect (sense)

What better time for kids to make spending mistakes than when you can monitor their activity and correct any unhealthy financial habits. When they use a debit card, you can track their spending activity from anywhere and then later discuss and re-direct their spending. And, when they do make a financial mistake, and you’ve set a spending limit, it’s the perfect learning opportunity!

Spending Safely   

Carrying around a lot of cash has risks. If your teen’s wallet is stolen, you won’t be able to recoup the lost cash. Debit cards are safer, as they protect your child’s money with a security code, and they are subject to spending limits that you can control.

Cashless Convenience

No more handing out cash or worrying that they have enough for last-minute events. You can transfer money into their debit card account in seconds with a digital app, no matter where you are. Plus, it gives them the ability to not only use the card, but to get cash from an ATM while they are out.

The Credit They Deserve

Using a debit card won’t help with their credit report, but teaching kids to use a debit card responsibly is the first step toward building a good credit score later. If kids can keep debit card spending managed properly, that will affect their credit card habits later and help them establish a strong credit score.

If you’re looking for a youth debit card with all of these features and no maintenance fees, check out the Start Young Visa® Debit Card, the debit card that safely helps you prepare your teens (and even younger children) for the world of digital banking. The card is included with every Start Young Saving and Spending Account from Evangelical Christian Credit Union, the trusted source for Christian financial training.

Evangelical Christian Credit Union (ECCU) stands with homeschooling families with offers and resources that are specifically designed to benefit your unique lifestyle. 

 

Click the image and join the Financial Guidance Counselor Program for Free!

financial-guidance-counselor

And make your plans to join us at Teach Them Diligently Conventions this spring because we’ll have a special track of sessions that are all about finances, money savings, and financial education.

 

teach them diligently convention events speakers

 

For more great articles about teaching your children how to manage their money and more homeschooling information be sure to check out the Teach Them Diligently Blog.

Sign up for the newsletter to receive more great articles!

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Register for the Homeschool Convention Today
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3 Strategies for Raising Good Stewards

You can give your kids all kinds of rules for playing with others: share, use nice words, don’t bite. But the moment a child understands that they should treat others like they’d like to be treated, the “rules” become less necessary.

The same is true for stewardship.

Christian stewardship is the simple belief that the universe was created by—and belongs to—God. And when we teach kids that we’re to care for creation on His behalf, it impacts everything—including money management. It’s not about teaching rules; it’s about developing a mindset.

Teaching financial stewardship is about showing kids how to be smart with money, modeling wise financial behavior, and equipping them with the best tools to manage their funds.

Teaching Stewardship

Even small children can grasp financial concepts, so don’t be afraid to start young. With younger kids, it’s as easy as allowing them to use their imaginations.

Why not create a pretend store where they can shop. You can use old cereal boxes or canned goods. The catch is that they only have a certain amount of “money,” so they have to shop carefully. Eventually, you can give them responsibilities on actual shopping trips.

They’ll also benefit from opportunities to learn about banking. A spending and savings account where they can put gift and allowance money is a great place to start.

Interested in learning more about bank account for kids? Click here.

 

Modeling Stewardship

Consider ways to show them how you monitor your finances. Do you have money-saving practices like clipping coupons, making shopping lists, or using a grocery-store app? Encourage them to help you.

Have you talked to your child about paying bills? Tithing? Have they seen a utility bill and understand that you pay for things like water and electricity? This builds awareness that stewardship requires choices and priorities.

And as you work on the household budget, your child can be part of the process by suggesting ways to reduce costs. This kind of involvement models what good stewardship looks like.

Equipping for Stewardship

Children are more comfortable with tech than ever before, and access to these tools can improve their understanding of banking. Some parents worry that giving their children access to banking tools too soon might encourage irresponsibility, but research shows that the opposite is true.

What children learn about finances will impact them their entire life, and the sooner you get them started, the better you’ll be able to reinforce a lifetime of smart money management. Studies show that by age seven, they’re already forming many of the financial habits and behaviors that will impact the rest of their life. So teach them to use these tools early.

Here are some ways to introduce digital banking basics:

1. Get them their own debit card.

Many adults tend to think debit cards are special because they didn’t grow up with them. The fact is that they’re a regular part of managing money, and if we want to raise money-wise children, they need to be comfortable with debit cards.

Debit cards made just for kids? Click here to learn more.


2. Show them how to monitor their account online and protect their funds.

Stewardship is about mindfulness. To be responsible for their finances, kids need to learn to observe their accounts and keep them safe.

Monitor accounts with your kids. Click here to learn how.

3. Teach them to deposit checks digitally and transfer money. 

A couple of decades ago you might have taught kids to write a check or deposit cash into an account. As more and more banking is done digitally, it’s crucial that we equip kids to bank with the latest tools.

If you’d like more information about how you can teach your children financial stewardship with safe, hands-on tools, look into Start Young Saving and Spending Accounts from Evangelical Christian Credit Union. Start Young Accounts will equip your children to carefully and responsibly manage their money.

Your children are going to spend their entire lives learning to be stewards of God’s resources. Why not get them started today with financial lessons that last a lifetime?

Evangelical Christian Credit Union (ECCU) stands with homeschooling families with offers and resources that are specifically designed to benefit your unique lifestyle. 

 

Click the image and join the Financial Guidance Counselor Program for Free!

financial-guidance-counselor

And make your plans to join us at Teach Them Diligently Conventions this spring because we’ll have a special track of sessions that are all about finances, money savings, and financial education.

 

Looking for more great articles about teaching your children how to manage and steward their money? Check out Pizza Prepares Kids To Make Sense Of Money, To Build Kid’s Money Handling Habits, Start Young, and Common Sense Savings Skills That Aren’t So Common on the Teach Them Diligently Blog.

Sign up for the newsletter to receive more great articles!

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4 Money Mistakes Teens Make

Imagine if all your income was disposable, and you had very few responsibilities. It would be a real challenge to develop the disciplines required for long-term financial health. This is where a lot of teens start when they’re introduced to money.

As parents, it’s our job to instill a healthy attitude about money while equipping our kids with skills to manage their finances. Our teens are going to make some mistakes. But if we’re paying attention, we can help them make mid-course corrections and keep them on track.

Let’s look at four mistakes teens make when managing their finances.

  1. Spending too much on special events  

When it comes to events like concerts or sporting events, kids feel a social pressure similar to adults. Parents can help teens negotiate their spending on these events, showing them how to get deals and create a special evening that’s within their means.

It’s also an excellent opportunity to talk to them about financial peer pressure. There will always be a temptation to make financial decisions in an attempt to impress friends and families. The earlier we can help them recognize this tendency, the better.

  1. Not putting money into savings

Some kids are natural savers, but all kids need to learn to put money away. Unfortunately, a lot of kids will spend it as fast as it comes in.

Teens practice spending habits that they’ll carry into adulthood—so if they don’t learn to put money away when they’re young, they may struggle to make a habit out of it when they’re older.

Need a youth savings account that you can monitor together? Check out this option.

  1. Delaying understanding credit

Parents aren’t typically thinking about their teen’s credit, which could eventually be a bit of a problem. Believe it or not, in a few years when they actually need good credit to rent an apartment or buy a car, they may not have it yet. At minimum, teach them how credit works.

But before going out and opening a credit card in your teen’s name, try a safer approach with a debit card. This will give them practice using a card responsibly, a skill they can use later to build their credit. And with the right debit card, you can also control the spending limits and monitor spending habits.

Looking for a teen debit card that you can control? Here’s a good one.

  1. Carrying cash

Carrying cash can make it easy to spend, lose, or loan money—and after it’s gone, there’s no real record of where it went. We live in an age when everything from music to banking is digital, and our teens needs to be prepared. They should know how to monitor their account from an app, make mobile person-to-person payments, use a debit card, and digitally deposit checks. That way, the cashless world won’t be a big puzzle to them later.

 

Start Young Savings and Spending Accounts from Evangelical Christian Credit Union  help prepare your teen (and even younger children) for the world of digital banking. It’s the safe and secure way for them to learn the necessary skills required for managing their finances, and it gives you the visibility required to guide them through the process. Give your teen the tools they need to take flight today.

 

Looking for more great articles about teaching your children how to manage and steward their money? Check out Pizza Prepares Kids To Make Sense Of Money, To Build Kid’s Money Handling Habits, Start Young, and Common Sense Savings Skills That Aren’t So Common on the Teach Them Diligently Blog.

 

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Attending a Teach Them Diligently Convention in 2019 is one change that is guaranteed to help your homeschool– and bless your family! We hope you will make that a priority!  Watch the video for more information!

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The Key to Teaching Your Kids About Money… is to Start Young

If you’ve wondered whether it’s too early to start teaching your kids about money, consider this excerpt from Let’s learn about money! Teaching young children about money, an article published by Penn State Extension:

As children grow and start to make choices, they learn that people, things, and money have value. These concepts form the foundation for understanding the importance of spending, sharing, and saving.

In other words, it’s never to early to understand money.

Start Young Road Map

At Evangelical Christian Credit Union (ECCU), we couldn’t agree more. Our conviction is that earlier is better to begin developing not only an understanding of money, but also the biblical values of generosity and stewardship. It’s why we created Start Young Savings and Spending Accounts and the FREE Start Young Road Map: A Guide for Training Financially Responsible Kids to help you get started.

And because this is for you and your kids, the digital guide is designed to capture and keep their attention as they learn.

The fun, free and downloadable Start Young Road Map includes money management ideas for kids ages 0-7. The digital guide is packed with practical ideas that you can use in everyday life to introduce your kids to a foundation of concepts to earn, give, save and spend.

For example:

  • How they can earn money in small ways
  • Ideas for sharing to teach giving
  • How to build good savings habits
  • Using everyday events to teach financial foundations

And the Start Young Road Map is just the beginning, as it helps to get your creative juices flowing. For example, here’s another idea inspired from the guide.

To get your kids excited about vacation and make saving fun, create a “Vacation Fun Fund” jar that everyone in the family can add to during the year and cash in at vacation time. You can also work money concepts into your kids’ imaginary games, like playing pretend restaurant or store. The ideas are endless.

And, if you have kids of various ages you want to train to handle money more wisely, there’s a portion of Start Young Road Map dedicated to pre-teens and a section for teens as well.

To get started teaching your kids about money, follow this link for free access to Start Young Road Map: A Guide for Training Financially Responsible Kids

About the Author:

 

In 28 years of marriage, Rachel Soto and her husband David have welcomed six sons into their family. Those boys gave her 15 years of homeschool experience; she taught them through high school. With the boys off to college or on their own now, she returned to work at Evangelical Christian Credit Union (ECCU). When she’s not working, she enjoys cooking, reading, coffee dates with friends and even an occasional nap.

 

 

 

 

Looking for more great articles about teaching your children how to manage and steward their money? Check out Pizza Prepares Kids To Make Sense Of Money, To Build Kid’s Money Handling Habits, Start Young, and Common Sense Savings Skills That Aren’t So Common on the Teach Them Diligently Blog.

 

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Tweens and Saving Money

There’s never really been a good word for kids between the ages of 8–12. There was a time in the early fifties when they were called “subteens.” Flattering, right? Some folks started calling them “‘tween-agers,” and eventually we just settled on “tweens.”

Our struggle to come up with an acceptable term for this group reinforces the idea that 8–12 is kind of a lost age. They don’t require the same kind of constant supervision as young kids, but they don’t have the independence of teenagers.

But this is a pivotal time where kids feel trapped in an awkward transition. They’re learning to relate to peers, adjust to social rules, and develop the skills they’ll need in their teen years. And these skills include money management.

 

Here are some hands-on tips for giving them a financial jump start.

 

Start talking to them about banking.

If you don’t have a savings and spending account for your pre-teens, it’s probably time. Learning to manage a bank account is a must. In fact, putting money into a savings account is one of the best habits a tween can pick up. For every $10 they earn, try encouraging them to put $1 into savings.

If you’re curious about savings and spending accounts for your tween, take a look at these new options.

 

Get them a debit card.

Our world is a lot less reliant on bills and coins. And a debit card prepares your child for money handling in a largely digital world. Think about it this way; when you can control the spending limits and access, a card becomes safer than giving your kids cash—especially when you can set limits on the card.

Debit cards for kids? Yep! You can learn more here.

 

Help them make online purchases.

Making an online purchase is a fairly common activity. Kids should be as comfortable buying something on Amazon as they are making brick-and-mortar store purchases. Guiding them through this process demystifies this ordinary task.

 

Teach them how to monitor their account with an app.

Monthly paper bank statements are so 2006. It’s easier than ever to track your account activity. The ability to check in on your account from a mobile app adds a whole new level of security to banking. Your child should be able to monitor their account and their spending habits—and you should, too.

Learn more about mobile banking apps for you and your tween.

 

Help them make money outside the home.

At this age, they’re ready to start experimenting with work. Why not talk to family, neighbors, and church members about opportunities for doing yard work, babysitting, or helping others with chores? This not only helps them make money to deposit in their account, but it also instills a strong work ethic.

 

Give your tween a jump start.

You can’t teach the most important lessons in a day; they require consistent involvement and reinforcement. That’s why it’s critical to teach your child smart money managing principles and techniques early.

 

You want your tween to jump into their teens with boldness. The Start Young Savings and Spending Accounts from Evangelical Christian Credit Union (ECCU) will equip your child with the tools they need to manage their money effectively while offering you the right amount of visibility into every area. It’s confidence for them—and you!

 

Check out the Start Young Accounts today, and start preparing your child for their teen years.

 

Looking for more great articles about teaching your children how to manage and steward their money? Check out Pizza Prepares Kids To Make Sense Of Money, To Build Kid’s Money Handling Habits, Start Young, and Common Sense Savings Skills That Aren’t So Common on the Teach Them Diligently Blog.

 

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Aiming Arrows into Adulthood

Teach Them Diligently 365 members, listen to:

“Aiming Arrows into Adulthood”

As homeschooling parents, how can we prepare our children for adulthood? And how can we prepare our hearts (through prayer and effective communication) to release our kids, into a new season? There’s life after graduation– with college, careers, romance, weddings, and next-generation purpose. Let’s aim and launch our arrows to hit God’s mark!

Become a member of Teach Them Diligently 365 for access to more!

Sign up for a free 7 day trial and explore the extensive content!

 

Register for the Homeschool Convention Today

Originally aired as a Facebook Live, this video will give you some great insights and ideas for how to teach your children to succeed financially. Linda Carlson and Vere Reynolds from Evangelical Christian Credit Union are part of the Homeschool Financial Counselor Team here at Teach Them Diligently, and they shared some incredibly helpful ideas for preparing your children to be financially prepared as they get older.

In this conversation, Linda and Vere cover the following topics:

How to Help them Build a budget

How to Help them Prioritize spending

How to Help them Gather their tools (Understand the Basics of Opening and Managing a Bank Account)

How to Help them Plan Ahead

How To Help Them Get familiar with Credit

 CLICK HERE TO WATCH THIS VIDEO ON TEACH THEM DILIGENTLY 365.

We are so excited about this new Homeschool Financial Counselor program, for we really believe it will give us all some tools to help us in an area that is not often discussed and about which many of us feel a little bit ill-equipped.  Sign up for the FREE Homeschool Financial Counselor Program to make sure you don’t miss any of this helpful content about teaching your children how to handle their finances. Check out some of the other articles that have been published as part of the homeschool financial counselor program.

Learn more about the ECCU Start Young Program and how that tool can be invaluable to your family as you teach your children solid financial principles.

Linda Carlson also did an interview with Leslie about Teaching Your Children about Money. Check that out here.

Make sure you plan to join us for TTD2019 next Spring as the homeschool financial counselor team gives even more helps and workshops to help you as you teach your children about finances. Register today and make your plans to join us there!

Register for the Homeschool Convention Today
Homeschooling Parents

About David and Leslie Nunnery

Leslie Nunnery and her husband David founded Teach Them Diligently, the nation’s premier source for gospel-centered homeschool events. With seven years of homeschooling experience from preschool-high school and a passion to encourage and equip homeschool families, this mom of 4 shares her know-how and insights weekly through Teach Them Diligently media and on TeachThemDiligently365.com.

Yes, I want more from this Homeschooling Community!